This library of social media assets is for organizations and individuals to use on social media platforms, websites, flyers, or emails. Our goal is to increase awareness of mental health and help reduce stigma. 

Simply right click to download and share. 

Resources are grouped by month based on the 2022/2023 calendar year.

Have suggestions for future content? Looking to add your organization’s logo to an image? Get in touch!

November 2022

November 1 & 2: Today we celebrate Day of the Dead. This celebration honors those who have passed on and celebrates the love and memories that we shared with them. Grieving is an important process to walk through, as avoidance can affect your mental health. Take the time to remember your loved ones, and remind yourself that grieving has no timeline. 

Optional additional language: If you are in need of mental health resources, visit: http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

November 11: On Veterans Day we honor and remember the services and sacrifices of our veterans. Today is also a reminder to advocate for veterans’ mental health. According to the CDC, veterans disproportionately experience factors linked to suicide, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, social isolation, and access to lethal means. They protect us, and we support them. 

Optional additional language: For mental health resources in the metro area check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

Taking care of your mental health shouldn’t stop while you’re at work. Workplaces that intentionally create cultures to support mental health set their employees up for success. Employees can show up authentically, cope better with challenges and setbacks, and remain agile as changes arise. When employees thrive, organizations thrive.

Optional additional language: For more information on resources available to you and your employees, visit: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

December 2022

Navigating the holidays can feel overwhelming, and putting your mental health first makes a difference. Prioritizing your mental health can reduce holiday stress and help you enjoy the season. 

Optional additional language: For more self-care resources visit: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

December 3: Today we celebrate International Day of Persons with Disabilities. People with disabilities can encounter additional challenges when seeking mental health care. Everyone deserves quality mental healthcare. 

Optional additional language: For mental health resources visit: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

The end of the year is often a time to examine what you accomplished, and you may feel like you just didn’t measure up to where you “should” be. Remember that you are exactly where you need to be, and celebrate yourself! Take time to enjoy your favorite activities, and find a healthy way to cope with stress.

Optional additional language: For self-care resources visit: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

January 2023

Third Monday of January (Jan. 16): Today we honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who fought for civil rights and equality. Mental health is something that affects everyone but disproportionately affects Black communities. Black men and women are 20% more likely to experience a severe mental health condition in their lifetime, but they’re also less likely to receive treatment. Mental health stigma and racial discrimination can make it difficult to access treatment. Community support can help. 

Optional additional language: For self-care resources visit: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

It’s important for us to rest. While this can look different for each of us, it is crucial to set work/life boundaries as resting improves our mental health. Focus on taking care of yourself. 

Optional additional language: For mental health resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

It takes 30-60 days to make a new habit stick or to break an old one. Start with small goals and remember to strive for progress not perfection. January can feel like a sprint after some time away from your regular routine. Be mindful and stay present.

Optional additional language: For more self-care resources visit: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

February 2023

Black History Month is a time to honor the extraordinary contributions of Black thinkers, leaders, and doers. We can’t end the stigma around mental health without also working to end systemic racism.

Optional additional language: For mental health resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

Black History Month is a time to celebrate the accomplishments and contributions made by Black leaders, activists, and changemakers. It is also a time to address the systemic racism that affects people’s lives – from the ability to access mental health services to physical safety. This month may only last 28 days, but the lessons and learnings should carry on all 365 days of the year.

Optional additional language: For mental health resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

Breaking the stigma around mental health can start at home! 

Here are a few tips for you to use when discussing mental health with your child:

  • Communicate in a straightforward manner.
  • Speak at a level that is appropriate for their age and development level. 
  • Discuss the topic when your child feels safe and comfortable.
  • Watch for reactions during the discussion, and slow down or back up if your child seems confused or upset. 
  • Listen openly, and let your child tell you about their feelings and worries.

Source

For mental health resources in our community check out: http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

March 2023

Talking about mental health with your family and children can feel uncomfortable at first, but it doesn’t have to. People often default to saying “I’m fine” when they may not be. Give people the space to speak openly and honestly. Talking about mental health regularly opens the door for honest conversations. For mental health resources in our community check out:

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

Mental health is just as important as physical health and contributes to your overall well-being. Taking care of your mental health and making it a priority is important and can be fun. Here are some tips for you to try at home: 

  • Get closer to nature! Go for walks, and focus your senses on your surroundings. 
  • Learn to understand and manage your feelings. Give your feelings attention without judging them and without putting yourself down. Name what you are feeling and talk kindly to yourself. 
  • Talk to someone you trust for support. Talking things out can be helpful and may help provide a new perspective. 
  • Get more from your sleep. Develop a bedtime routine that you find relaxing and try to go to sleep and wake up at around the same time everyday. Sleep is replenishing, and your mind and body need rest! 

Source

For more self-care resources check out: http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

Both mental health and substance use conditions affect people from all walks of life and all age groups. While these conditions are common and often serious, they are treatable and many people do recover. According to Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), if these two conditions coexist they are referred to as co-occurring.  Remember you are not alone, and there is support available!

Optional additional language: To find mental health and substance use disorder resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

April 2023

April is National Minority Health Month, a time to raise awareness about health disparities that continue to affect people from racial and ethnic minority groups. People deserve culturally competent and quality mental and physical healthcare regardless of race, ethnicity, age, and gender.  

Optional additional language: To find mental health resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

Sometimes life can feel a little overwhelming. It’s okay for you to take time out of your day and take care of yourself! Taking this time for yourself will help you be a better friend, family member, and employer. Take care of you!

Talking about mental health isn’t easy, but starting the conversation helps everyone. Often just talking about it can be the first step to understanding someone’s headspace. As an ally, you can let people know that you’re willing to talk about mental health by being open about your own experience or by lending a listening ear when the time is right for them. 

Optional additional language: if you are ready to share your story and help decrease the stigma around mental health, visit:

whatmakesus.com/us

May 2023

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AAPI month). This commemorative month recognizes the historical and cultural contributions of AAPI individuals and groups to American culture and society. It’s essential we highlight and celebrate these contributions, and it’s also important to note that many individuals in the AAPI community face discrimination and stigma. Mental Health America notes that AAPI adults are three times less likely than their white counterparts to seek mental health services, and AAPI adults have historically had challenges accessing healthcare and insurance. We need to address these barriers in order to ensure everyone has access to the help they need.

Optional additional language: To find mental health resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

May is Mental Health Awareness Month! It’s a time to raise awareness around mental health and individuals living with mental health conditions. It’s also a time to openly and honestly discuss mental health in order to reduce the stigma that many people in our community experience. 

Optional additional language: if you are ready to share your story and help decrease the stigma around mental health, visit:

whatmakesus.com/us

May 14: For many people, Mother’s Day is a reminder of loss and can be hard to get through, especially with reminders on social media. Reaching out to someone who may be struggling today will only take a few minutes, and it can make their day better.

Optional additional language: To find mental health resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

June 2023

Happy Pride Month! Pride is all about celebrating people for who they are, and that attitude helps everyone. You don’t have to change yourself to be part of our community; you already are. Everyone deserves to know that they belong here.

Optional additional language: if you are ready to share your story and help decrease the stigma around mental health, visit:

whatmakesus.com/us

Happy Father’s Day! Today we celebrate dads and father figures. Remember that this day can also be hard for many people. Reaching out to someone in your life  who may be struggling today will only take a few minutes, and it can make their day better.

Optional additional language: To find mental health resources in our community check out: 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

June 19: June 19th marks a historically important event in the U.S. Known as Juneteenth, it’s considered by many to be the country’s second Independence Day. Although we have come a long way, there is still work to do as racism and injustice persist. According to Mental Health America, Black individuals are offered medication or therapy at lower rates than the general population. It is important for us all to continue to push for change in order to ensure that everyone has access to the quality healthcare they deserve. 

http://thewellbeingpartners.org/resources

Mental Health During Transitions

See Spanish versions on Recursos en Español page. 

Change can bring uncertainty. Use these messages to support your community in times of transition.

Use the suggested captions below to accompany the images. Don’t forget to tag @WhatMakesUsMW when posting so we can help amplify your messages.

Mental Health During Transitions:

Change may be a constant, but that doesn’t make it any easier to deal with. It takes 30 to 60 days to make a new habit stick or to break an old one, so give yourself time and patience as you navigate the twists and turns of the pandemic.

Eating Disorders:

There are a lot of myths around eating disorders, in part because of how they’re portrayed in films and TV shows. 

The truth is that anyone can have an eating disorder, regardless of age, skin color, or body size. No one chooses to have a medical condition — and that’s what eating disorders are. But help is out there for you or a loved one, and often the first step to admitting you need help is opening up to someone you trust.

Mental Health During Transitions:

If you’re heading back to an office or starting to socialize in public more, you may be feeling a bit uneasy — and you aren’t alone.

It’s okay to be worried about adjusting to a different work environment, so lean on your friends, family members, and coworkers because they’re likely feeling similarly.

Talking about Mental Health with your Children & Family

Breaking stigma around mental health can start at home! Use the images below to encourage families to start conversations around mental health with their loved ones.

National and Local Mental Health Resources

Use the images below to spread the word about these free mental health services available to all.

Mental Health in the Black Community

See Spanish versions on Recursos en Español page. 

Mix and match these suggested captions with the images below.

Black History Month:

When it comes to mental health, the Black community experiences the double burden of stigma because of discrimination against their race and against their mental health condition. As we work to end the stigma around mental health, we must acknowledge those who experience it the most; everyone deserves fair and equal respect.

Black History Month:

Just weeks after we inaugurated the first Black and first Asian American Vice President of the United States, we celebrate Black History Month. This month is about the Black community’s significant contributions to art, music, culture, and society.

Black History Month is also a time to address the systemic racism that affects real people’s lives – from the ability to access mental health services to physical safety. This month may only last 28 days, but the lessons and learnings should carry on all 365 days of the year.

Black History Month:

Black people are 20% more likely to experience a severe mental health condition in their lifetime, but they’re also less likely to receive treatment. Mental health stigma and racial discrimination make it difficult to access treatment, but community support can help.

Black History Month:

Black History Month is a time to honor the extraordinary contributions of Black thinkers, leaders, and doers. It’s a time to pay tribute to these scientists, artists, and writers. Black people have helped advance society while also facing discrimination, bigotry, and hate. As Maya Angelou said, “hate, it has caused a lot of problems in the world, but has not solved one yet.” We can’t end the stigma around mental health without also working to end systemic racism.

Recognizing Stigmatizing Language

See Spanish versions on Recursos en Español page. Email us to have your logo added to the fact sheet!

Mix and match these suggested captions with the images below.

Stigmatizing Language:

Contrary to the old adage, words actually can hurt as much as sticks and stones. When we use stigmatizing language, we spread the idea that people with mental health conditions are somehow different when they’re not. Hear stories from people that are so much more than their mental health condition @whatmakesumw.

Stigmatizing Language:

The weather isn’t bipolar. People’s body shape doesn’t make them anorexic. Attention to detail isn’t OCD. Mental health conditions are real, but stigmatizing language can diminish what they really mean and make it harder for someone who’s struggling to get help. Reduce stigma by being aware of your language. @whatmakesusmw.

Stigmatizing Language:

We often use stigmatizing words without realizing how harmful they might be. Words like “psycho” and “crazy” have become part of our regular vocabulary, so take stock of how often you use these phrases – it’s likely more than you think. Make a conscious effort to use language that respects all people. @whatmakesusmw

Stigmatizing Language:

Millions of people have mental health conditions, but not a single person is defined by that condition. They also have friendships, relationships, interests, hobbies, and passions – these define someone much more than a diagnosis. Hear stories from people that are so much more than their mental health conditions at @whatmakesusmw.

Encouragement for the New Year

Mix and match the images and captions below to share messages of encouragement as we kick off the a new year!

On working from home:

Our houses have turned into offices, schools, gyms, and restaurants. Prioritize your well-being by setting boundaries and separating work from home.

Working from home in the middle of a pandemic can add extra stress to an already busy time of year. Talk with your co-workers about how you’re doing and remember that a stigma-free workplace is actually healthier and more productive.

On New Year’s resolutions:

It takes 30 to 60 days to make a new habit stick or to break an old one. Start with small goals and remember to strive for progress, not perfection.

January can feel like a sprint after some time away from your regular routine. Be mindful and stay in the present moment this month.

On Exercising:

 Remember when gym class was the highlight of the day? Bring the fun back to movement by finding something you actually enjoy – your body and mind will thank you.

Exercise: From strength training to Zumba, there’s an activity for everyone (and you can do it from your very own living room!). Finding a workout routine that you enjoy will make it feel less like work and more like fun.

On winter blues:

The days may be short, but they certainly feel long when we’re stuck at home. Beat the cabin fever by getting out even for just a few minutes each day. Fresh air, activity, and a change of scenery are good for your well-being.

January can be a difficult time for mental health between lack of daylight and dreary weather. With an ongoing pandemic, prioritizing mental health is crucial. Take time to de-stress with your favorite activities – whatever they are.

Starting the Conversation Around Mental Health

Mental Health and the Holidays

Click to download the PDF Fact Sheet!

Financial Stress and Mental Health

Stop Stigma in Your Community

Physical Activity and Mental Health


Have any questions or suggestions? Reach out for more information!

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